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Social Learning Theory and the Explanation of Crime Advances in Criminological Theory Series (Advances in Criminological Theory) by

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  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Transaction Publishers .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Crime & criminology,
  • Psychology,
  • Social theory,
  • Criminology (General),
  • Social Sciences Research,
  • Social Science,
  • Sociology,
  • Criminology,
  • Research

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsRonald Akers (Editor), Gary Jensen (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages379
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL11716221M
ISBN 101412806496
ISBN 109781412806497
OCLC/WorldCa144222629

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  Social learning theory has been called the dominant theory of crime and delinquency in the United States, yet it is often misrepresented. This latest volume in the distinguished Advances in Criminological Theory series explores the impact of this theory. Some equate it with differential association by: Social Learning Theory and the Explanation of Crime. Social Learning Theory and the Explanation of Crime book. Social Learning Theory and the Explanation of Crime. It extends the literature by testing a social learning model of subcultural formation and violence among adolescents that has its roots in local labor market conditions and Cited by: 1. 16 rows    Social learning theory has been called the dominant theory of crime and Reviews: 1. It investigates the extent to which social learning variables account for the use of violence against an .

DOI link for Social Learning Theory and the Explanation of Crime. Social Learning Theory and the Explanation of Crime book. Social Learning Theory and the Explanation of Crime book. Edited By Gary Jensen. Edition 1st Edition. First Published eBook Published 28 July Pub. location New York. Imprint Routledge. Book Description. Social learning theory has been called the dominant theory of crime and delinquency in the United States, yet it is often misrepresented. This latest volume in the distinguished Advances in Criminological Theory series explores the impact of this theory. Some equate it with differential association theory. Social learning theory has been called the dominant theory of crime and delinquency in the United States, yet it is often misrepresented. This latest volume in the distinguished Advances in Criminological Theory series explores the impact of this theory. Some equate it with differential association theory. It begins with a brief overview of the theoretical origins of social learning theory and a description of the four core theoretical elements. The chapter then reviews the relevant empirical evidence that has tested social learning theory as an explanation for crime and deviance, with particular attention to the results from a recent meta Cited by:

Lanza-Kaduce, L., & Capece, M. (). Social structure social learning (SSSL) and binge drinking: A specific test of an integrated theory. In R. L. Akers & G. F. Jensen (Eds.), Social learning theory and the explanation of crime: A guide for the new century. The social learning theory of criminology says that people learn from the community around them. This happens in two ways: Differential association is the idea that people learn values and. This book deals with criminological theory, criminology, and criminal justice. It addresses a wide range of topics relevant to criminology, including socioeconomic factors that contribute to crime such as biology, community and inequality, emotions, immigration, social institutions, social learning, social support, parenting, peer networks, street culture, and market economy.   Social Learning Theory and Crime/Deviance According to social learning theory, people engage in crime because of their association with others who engage in crime. Their criminal behavior is reinforced and they learn beliefs that are favorable to crime. They essentially have criminal models that they associate : Ashley Crossman.